Continuous therapy is crucial

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Schizophrenia is a prolonged, chronic condition requiring antipsychotic therapy.1, 9

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As with other chronic diseases, such as diabetes, it is very important to ensure continuous effect of the therapy, regardless of the type of the therapy.9 

The most common cause of relapse is that the patient fails to take the drugs as prescribed.

The rate of relapses is much higher if the patients fail to comply with the treatment, and relapses damage the brain each time.

Therefore, it is extremely important for patients with schizophrenia to do everything to fully comply with the doctor’s recommendation -  the patient’s family and relatives can do much to help.22 

For drugs to be taken every day, this means control on a daily basis, since it has to be ensured that the patient take the drug at the appropriate time every day, while inIn case of injection therapies, the patient has to visit the doctor as scheduled times. The risk of relapses and hospitalization is increased by short interruption of the treatment or only slight deviations from the prescription.23  

In case of recurring symptomsdue totoo low doses of medication or as a result of a life event, a temporary increase of the dose may be necessary to avoid full relapse.1

  • References

    1. APA Clinical Guidelines. American Psychiatric Association. Practice guidelines for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia. 2004
    2. Falkai P et al. World J Biol Psychiatry 2005; 6: 132-191.
    3. Kendler KS et al. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1996; 53: 1022-1031.
    4. World Health Organization. The World Health Report: 2001: Mental health: new understanding, new hope.
    5. American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 4th Edition Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). Arlington: American Psychiatric Publishing Inc. 2000.
    6. Lieberman JA et al. J Clin Psychiatry 1996; 57(suppl 9): 5-9.
    7. Breier A et al. Am J Psychiatry 1994; 151: 20-26.
    8. Robinson DG et al. Am J Psychiatry 1999; 156: 544-549.
    9. National Institute for Clinical Excellence. National Clinical Practice Guidelines Number 82.
    10. Howard R et al. Am J Psychiatry 2000; 157: 172-178.
    11. Angermeyer MC et al. Schizophr Bull 1990; 16: 293-307.
    12. Murray RM and Fearon P. J Psychiatr Res 1999; 33: 497-499.
    13. Lang UE et al. Cell Physiol Biochem 2007; 20: 687-702.
    14. Harrigan SM et al. Psychol Med 2003; 33: 97-110.
    15. Bottlender R et al. Schizophr Res 2003; 62: 37-44.
    16. Lynn Starr h. et al: Comparison of long-acting and oral antipsychotic treatment effects in patients with schizophrenia, comorbid substance abuse, and a history of recent incarceration: An exploratory analysis of the PRIDE study; Schizophr Res. 2018 Apr;194:39-46. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2017.05.005. Epub 2017 Jun 7
    17. Awad AG et al. Pharmacoeconomics 2008; 26: 149-162.
    18. Keith SJ et al. Psychiatr Serv 2004; 55: 997-1005.
    19. Lieberman JA et al. Pharmacol Rev 2008; 60: 358-403.
    20. Tandon R et al. Psychoneuroendocrinology 2003; 28(suppl 1): 9-26.
    21. Wyatt RJ. Schizophr Bull 1991; 17: 325–351
    22. Robinson DG et al. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1999; 56: 241-247.
    23. Weiden PJ et al. Psychiatr Serv 2004; 55: 886-891.
    24. Koen L et al. Psychosomatics 2007; 48: 128-134.
    25. Novick D et al. Psychiatry Res 2010; 176: 109-113.
    26. Kozma CM et al. Changes in schizophrenia-related hospitalization and ER use among patients receiving paliperidone palmitate. Current Medical Research and Opinion. 2011.27;1603-1611

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