Therapeutic approaches

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For most schizophrenia patients, drug  treatment is indispensable to alleviate the symptoms of schizophrenia.2, 9

CEE_SCHIZO_treatment_02_C
Stock photo. Posed by model.

However, even schizophrenia patients who are relatively free of psychotic symptoms can have difficulties in everyday life, for example, they may have problems in communicating with their environment, decision-making, motivation, self-sufficiency and establishing and maintaining relationships.1, 9

Since schizophrenia usually occurs during young adulthood, that is, when the individual’s independent social skills develop and is searching for his/her “place in the world”, these are very important areas and psychotherapy can be really beneficial in these areas.

Your doctor will draw up your treatment plan together with you by considering your goals. The doctor will discuss with you your therapeutic options, including long-acting drugs to be taken every day.

  • References

    1. APA Clinical Guidelines. American Psychiatric Association. Practice guidelines for the treatment of patients with schizophrenia. 2004
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    5. American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 4th Edition Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR). Arlington: American Psychiatric Publishing Inc. 2000.
    6. Lieberman JA et al. J Clin Psychiatry 1996; 57(suppl 9): 5-9.
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    9. National Institute for Clinical Excellence. National Clinical Practice Guidelines Number 82.
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    16. Lynn Starr h. et al: Comparison of long-acting and oral antipsychotic treatment effects in patients with schizophrenia, comorbid substance abuse, and a history of recent incarceration: An exploratory analysis of the PRIDE study; Schizophr Res. 2018 Apr;194:39-46. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2017.05.005. Epub 2017 Jun 7
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    19. Lieberman JA et al. Pharmacol Rev 2008; 60: 358-403.
    20. Tandon R et al. Psychoneuroendocrinology 2003; 28(suppl 1): 9-26.
    21. Wyatt RJ. Schizophr Bull 1991; 17: 325–351
    22. Robinson DG et al. Arch Gen Psychiatry 1999; 56: 241-247.
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    26. Kozma CM et al. Changes in schizophrenia-related hospitalization and ER use among patients receiving paliperidone palmitate. Current Medical Research and Opinion. 2011.27;1603-1611

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